Cooking Methods

Cooking methods

Braising (same method for stews, casseroles and pot roasts)

Traditional method of braising includes gently cooking meat in a liquid (usually stock, alcohol or water). This slow process cooks meat by a combination of roasting and steaming to give less expensive shoulder muscles succulence and tenderness.

Braising meat can be acquired by stewing meat on the hob or by cooking at low temperatures in an oven in a casserole dish.

Preparation of Meat: Meat will be prepared to your liking by our skilled butchers, before cooking, remove meat from fridge to let it reach room temperature, this will slightly reduce the cooking time for you.

Sear Meat: This can be achieved in a very hot oven or hot pan on the hob.

In oven: This method is perfect for joints, pre heat oven to 220-250 degrees C, place meat in an open casserole dish or oven proof tray and put in the oven for approximately 20 minutes.

On the hob: this method is more suitable for casseroles and stews. Place chunks of meat in an open casserole dish or in a pan, using a small amount of oil, seal meat until brown but not burnt.

The method of searing meat seals and caramelises the meat to keep the juices in and helps improve the flavour. Vegetables can also be done in this way. Season the meat and vegetables to your liking.

Add any other ingredients, including herbs and spices. The next step is to add your liquid, for stews and casseroles ensure the majority of meat is covered. But for joints on fill from a quarter to a third as this will allow the exposed meat to steam.

Cooking ProcessCover with lid and reduce the temperature to 120-150 degrees C or if cooking on the hob, reduce to a low temperature (hob cooking only suitable for stews and casseroles). Checking liquid regularly and topping up if necessary.

Checking to see if your meat is cooked to your liking. Cooking times may vary depending on the meat and each individual oven. Stews and casseroles usually take at least: 1hour for chicken and pork or 2-3 hours for beef and lamb.

Joints will vary upon size and oven temperature. Therefore if you work on:

30 minutes per lb for pork and chicken

30 minutes per lb for beef and lamb rare, 35 minutes per lb for medium and 40minutes per lb for well done.

 

BBQ

Prepare BBQ- preheat gas BBQ for approx 10 minutes. For a charcoal BBQ the coals need to be heated for approx 30 minutes or until there is a layer of ash on the coals.

Preparing the meat- bring to room temperature to reduce cooking time and this will help to stop the meat from charring and burning. Season and marinade meat.

For perfect cooking the meat should not be hurried. It should be placed on the BBQ and cooked 60% before being turned. Only turn the meat once! And then continue to cook until it is cooked to your liking.

Checking Meat: Meat can be checked by touch. Rare = soft and Well done = Firmer with medium being somewhere in the middle. If unsure a thermometer would be a good buy, especially with poultry and larger joints.  Be careful not to burn the meat as it will be dry and charred.

Resting: meat should be placed on a clean plate and allowed to rest for about 10-15 minutes. This will ensure the meat is juicy and succulent.

 

Roasting

Roasting in a hot oven is a traditional method and one used in most Sunday dinners. It is a quick cooking method as opposed to slower cooking methods such as braising and cooking at lower temperatures.

Preparation of Meat: Meat will be prepared to your liking by our skilled butchers, before cooking, remove meat from fridge to let it reach room temperature, this will slightly reduce the cooking time for you.

Preheat the oven to 220-250 degrees C. Place the joint on an open roasting tray and seal the meat for 15-20 minutes until browned on the outside. Season the meat generously – we recommend English mustard or horseradish smeared over beef, garlic and or rosemary on lamb and salt and pepper on pork and chicken.

Cooking to your liking: Check cooking tables to see recommended times, larger joints will continue to rise in temperature between 2 and 5 degrees C after being removed from the oven so be careful not to overcook the meat as this can make it dry.

Resting Meat: it is very important to rest meat as it allows the fibres to relax and juices to spread through meat giving tenderness and succulence. This process is achieved by placing meat on a board or plate, covering with foil and leaving to rest for 20 minutes ( 30 minutes for larger joints)

Carving Meat: Carve the meat in even slices against the grain.

 

Pan Frying

Perfect for steaks, chops ands fillets. This method is quick cooking with the use of a frying pan, griddle or hot plate. Cooking to perfection is difficult but be aware that over coking may dry out the meat.

Preparing meat: Remove the meat from the fridge and allow meat to reach room temperature.

Pre Heat Pan: the pan should be at the highest temperature before you start cooking, a small amount of oil is to be placed in the pan or brushed over the meat to avoid sticking. The meat should sizzle when entering the pan, this will start the sealing process.

Cooking: Temperature should now be slightly reduced and the meat allowed to cook on one side before being turned. Meat should only be turned once! To give an even cook the meat should spend 50% of time on each side (poultry with skin on needs 70% of time on the skin side and 30% on meat side). If meat is very thick in depth and you would like your meat cooked medium to well done it may require placing in a hot oven until the meat is cooked to your liking.

Checking Meat: Meat can be checked by touch. Rare = soft and Well done = Firmer with medium being somewhere in the middle.

Resting Meat: it is very important to rest meat as it allows the fibres to relax and juices to spread through meat giving tenderness and succulence. To achieve this process the meat should be wrapped in foil and allowed to re soak the juices. Process should take 10-15 minutes.

Season and enjoy your meat or prepare a sauce while the meat is resting?

 

Grilling

Perfect for steak, chops and fillets. This method uses a rack under an intense heat to cook meat without the use of oil. Some may think this is a healthier and easier option.

Preparing meat: Remove the meat from the fridge and allow meat to reach room temperature.

Pre Heat the grill: Place grill on the highest temperature with the grill pan underneath. This will allow grill pan to heat up. Place the meat on the hot grill pan and this begins the cooking process.

Cooking: Allow meat to cook on the first side before turning only once! To give an even cook the meat should spend 60% of the time before being turned then spending the remaining 40% of time. If the meat is thick in depth the grill may need to be turned down to a lower temperature while the meat cooks through.

Checking Meat: Meat can be checked by touch. Rare = soft and Well done = Firmer with medium being somewhere in the middle.

Resting Meat: it is very important to rest meat as it allows the fibres to relax and juices to spread through meat giving tenderness and succulence. To achieve this process the meat should be wrapped in foil and allowed to re soak the juices. Process should take 10-15 minutes.

Season and enjoy your meat or prepare a sauce while the meat is resting?